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15 Fin-tastic Facts About The Green Lanternshark For Kids

Read these green lanternshark facts to learn more about this species.

The common name for this shark is the green lanternshark (Etmopterus virens) and it belongs to the family Etmopteridae. These sharks are known to be limited to the upper continental slopes or shelves in the western Central Atlantic. The range of this fish includes Texas, Florida, Cuba, and the Yucatan Peninsula in the northern Gulf of Mexico. In the Caribbean sea range, this fish is found in Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Venezuela, and Brazil. These fish can be seen or spotted frequently on the sea floors. The preferred elevations or depth include 643-3002 ft (196-915 m). Most of these fish are known to be found around the depths of 1148 ft (350 m). It is a member of the species of dogfish sharks.

This species is slender-bodied and has a blunt snout. There are five pairs of gill slots and they are known to be very short. The first dorsal fin is known to have a spine and starts over the margin of rounded and broad pectoral fins. The second dorsal fin is also known to have a spine. There is no anal fin. The first dorsal fin and the second dorsal fin are known to be equal to the distance or space between the tip of the snout or snout tip and the first-gill slit. There are some broad black markings present on the tail and undersides. These markings are known to have several light-emitting photophores. The diet or food of this lanternshark consists of squids and octopuses which can be larger than this shark and they are known to hunt or attack these marine animals in groups or schools. It is known to attack or hunt a large squid comparatively. The Etmopterus virens is known to be of no commercial importance. This species is not placed under the Red List and the population is of the Least Concern category.

Continue reading for more green lanternshark facts and if you are interested, read about the spiny dogfish shark and the nurse shark too.

Green Lanternshark Interesting Facts

What type of animal is a green lanternshark?

The green lanternshark (Etmopterus virens) is a fish.

What class of animal does a green lanternshark belong to?

It belongs to the class of Chondrichthyes of fish.

How many green lanternsharks are there in the world?

There is no exact number of the population of these lanternsharks that have been recorded or estimated.

Where does a green lanternshark live?

This fish (Etmopterus virens) is found in the western Central Atlantic's upper continental slopes or upper shelves. The range of the fish includes Texas, Florida, Cuba, and the Yucatan Peninsula in the northern Gulf of Mexico. In the Caribbean sea range, this fish is found in Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Venezuela, and Brazil.

What is a green lanternshark's habitat?

This fish can be seen or spotted frequently on sea floors and upper continental slopes or shelves. The preferred elevations or depth include 643-3002 ft (196-915 m). Most of these fish are known to be found around the depths of 1148 ft (350 m).

Who do green lanternsharks live with?

It is believed that green lanternsharks (Etmopterus virens) attack their prey in groups or packs.

How long does a green lanternshark live?

The exact lifespan of this fish is unknown.

How do they reproduce?

The reproduction of this fish is known to be aplacental viviparous and the females are known to give birth to a litter containing one to three young ones. Males of this species are known to reach sexual maturity when they are around 7-9 in (18-23 cm) and for females, it is around 8.7-10 in (22-25 cm).

What is their conservation status?

This species is listed under the Least Concern category of conservation status and is not placed under the Red List.

Green Lanternshark Fun Facts

What do green lanternsharks look like?

This shark species (Etmopterus virens) has a slender body, blunt, and short snout. The tail of this shark is narrow and long. The eyes are oval in shape and very large. Short skin flaps are known to precede the nostrils. There are five pairs of gill slots and they are known to be very short. The first dorsal fin is known to have a spine and starts over the margin of rounded and broad pectoral fins. The second dorsal fin is also known to have a spine. There is no anal fin. The first dorsal fin and the second dorsal fin are known to be equal to the distance between the snout tip and the first-gill slit. The caudal fin is placed low and is narrow and has an upper and a lower lobe that is known to be as long as the head. The dermal denticles are known to be thorn-shaped, stout and on the sides. These denticles are spaced widely and there exists no regular pattern. The snout is known to be covered with denticles and the dorsal coloration is dark brown-gray. The snout and body undersides are black and have a black marking behind and above the pelvic fin. There are back marks on the tail too and these markings have several light-emitting photophores.

The body and snout of this species with the common name green lanternsharks are some of its identifiable features.

*Please note that this is an image of a dogfish shark, not a green lanternshark. If you have an image of a green lanternshark, please let us know at [email protected]

How cute are they?

These sharks are not considered cute.

How do they communicate?

Green lanternsharks (Etmopterus virens) use tactile, chemical cues to communicate. Another way of communication in this fish is through the use of light-emitting photophores similar to other sharks in the family.

How big is a green lanternshark?

The length of adult females ranges from 8.7-10 in (22-25 cm) and that of an adult male ranges from 7-9 in (18-23 cm). They are smaller than a Caribbean reef shark and a zebra shark. Green lanternsharks can reach a maximum length of 10.2 in (26 cm).

How fast can a green lanternshark swim?

The exact speed of this shark, green lanternshark, is unknown.

How much does a green lanternshark weigh?

The weight of this species of shark is unknown.

What are the male and female names of the species?

There are no specific names for the males and females of the species Etmopterus virens or green lanternshark, which is the common name of this species.  

What would you call a baby green lanternshark?

There is no particular name for a baby green lanternshark (Etmopterus virens), but it is generally referred to as pups or young ones.

What do they eat?

These sharks mainly feed on octopuses and squids. They attack or feed on large squid. This large squid can sometimes be larger for a single individual.

Are they dangerous?

There have been no attacks or threats to humans recorded.

Would they make a good pet?

They woare not suitable as pets aas they are wild animals.

Kidadl Advisory: All pets should only be bought from a reputable source. It is recommended that as a potential pet owner you carry out your own research prior to deciding on your pet of choice. Being a pet owner is very rewarding but it also involves commitment, time and money. Ensure that your pet choice complies with the legislation in your state and/or country. You must never take animals from the wild or disturb their habitat. Please check that the pet you are considering buying is not an endangered species, or listed on the CITES list, and has not been taken from the wild for the pet trade.

Did you know...

Green lanternsharks, Etmopterus virens, were scientifically described by Henry B Bigelow, Stewart Springer, and William Schroeder in 1953.

These sharks are considered of no commercial value.

These lanternsharks are not targeted but are taken as bycatch in deepwater demersal fisheries.

Swell sharks and chain catsharks are known to glow green in the ocean. These green sharks produce a green glow.

Small sharks are referred to as dwarf lanternsharks.

How did the green lanternshark get its name?

Not much is known about the name of this shark, but this shark is not green in color.

Do lanternsharks attack humans?

There have been no threats or attacks recorded on humans by lanternsharks.

Here at Kidadl, we have carefully created lots of interesting family-friendly animal facts for everyone to discover! Learn more about some other fish from our spinner shark facts and basking shark facts pages.

You can even occupy yourself at home by coloring in one of our free printable baby shark coloring pages.

*Please note that this is an image of a dogfish shark, not a green lanternshark. If you have an image of a green lanternshark, please let us know at [email protected]
 

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