1. Home
  2. Fun Animal Facts
  3. 17 Amaze-wing Facts About The Masked Woodswallow For Kids

Animals

Kidadl Team

SEPTEMBER 03, 2021

17 Amaze-wing Facts About The Masked Woodswallow For Kids

Masked woodswallow facts are about these birds also called langrayen masqué and artamo enmascarado!

The masked woodswallow, Artamus personatus (Gould, 1841), is a type of bird that belongs to the family of Artamidae. The masked woodswallow range is primarily found in Australia. The masked woodswallow habitat primarily consists of arid shrubs, woodland, farmlands, and other such places that are usually away from coastal regions. Thee distribution of these birds are endemic to Australia, specifically eastern Australia. The masked woodswallow typically consumes insects and very occasionally, fruit or even nectar from some garden flower. Masked woodswallow feathers are known to be very soft and delicate. The upper half of this species has a black face that closely resembles a mask. This mask is usually located around the base of the pointy bill and the eyes. The lower half of the bird, below the throat, is lighter gray with a dark black or whitish undertail and white undertail in the Australian regions. The black tail feathers can be seen merging into pure white. The masked woodswallow ideally feed on insects because this species is strictly insectivorous. They may in occasional situations eat fruit or even nectar from some garden flower. The flying style of this swallow species is one of its identification factors.

Read on to discover more fun facts about this bird! For more relatable content, check out these flycatcher facts and palm cockatoo facts for kids.

Masked Woodswallow Interesting Facts

What type of animal is a masked woodswallow?

The masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) is a type of bird that belongs to the family of Artamidae and the genus of Artamus.

What class of animal does a masked woodswallow belong to?

The masked woodswallow, Artamus personatus (Gould, 1841), belongs to the class of Aves and the family Artamidae.

How many masked woodswallows are there in the world?

There is no record of how many masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) birds exist in the world today. However, there are 16 species of woodswallows including white-browed woodswallows. The distribution of masked woodswallows range is primarily found in Australia.

Where do masked woodswallows live?

The masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) lives in arid shrublands, woodland, farmlands and can also be found on roadsides sometimes. These woodswallows are native to Australia and are less common in and around coastal regions.

What is a masked wood swallows' habitat?

The masked woodswallow habitat primarily consists of arid shrubs, woodland, farmlands, and other such places that are usually away from coastal regions. These birds are endemic to Australia, specifically the eastern Australian region. Masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) birds are always in flocks. The masked woodswallow typically consumes insects and very occasionally, fruit or even nectar from some garden flower. Masked woodswallow migrate until the month of August. These birds have also been spotted with a bunch of other Passeriformes.

Who do masked woodswallows live with?

The masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) are a highly extroverted and social species of birds. These birds are often spotted flying in flocks or a group of birds, up to 20 birds. These birds are a nomadic species and are attached to their home grounds. Masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) birds are always seen together in a flock huddling up together in their own group in order to maintain heat and save energy.

How long does a masked woodswallow live?

The exact lifespan of a masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) has not yet been determined. This bird like various other species of its kind stays healthy and lively, provided left in the wild.

How do they reproduce?

Masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) birds are pair breeders exclusively, meaning they breed only in pair and stay with the partner bird for the majority of their lives and do not search for other partner birds. These birds usually breed from the months of August to December. Masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) birds are consistent migratory birds. These birds only breed with their kind of species and no records of mixed breeding have been recorded. The masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) breeds in most of its distribution range with the exception of eastern and south-eastern coastal areas. This black face bird usually breeds only once and occasionally twice a year. Masked woodswallow eggs are pure white and laid in clutches of two or four. Masked woodswallow babies usually hatch after two to four weeks of incubation. These black-face woodswallows take care of their young ones and keep an eye out for predators. The nest for these little ones is quite flimsy and is constructed out of twigs in stumps or trees. This nest is usually very delicate and only sturdy enough for immature masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) birds.

What is their conservation status?

The masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) does not fall into the Vulnerable species category. The conservation status of this species is Least Concern. A stable number of these birds are present in their distribution range. A lot of people consider the masked woodswallow Endangered, but this is not the case. This bird can not be spotted easily.

Masked Woodswallow Fun Facts

What do masked woodswallows look like?

The black-faced wood swallow better known as the masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) is a smoke-colored gray-brown bird. Masked woodswallow feathers are known to be very soft and delicate. The upper half of this species has a black face that closely resembles a mask. This mask is usually located around the base of the pointy bill and the eyes. The lower half of the bird, below the throat, is lighter gray with a dark black or whitish under tail white under the tail in the Australian regions. The black tail feathers can be seen merging into pure white. The dark blue bill is tipped in dark black. The young and immature birds are mainly soft brown with streaks in the lower half. They even have brush-like tongues to glean nectar. The lower half are pale buff-brown and they even have a pale brown bill. The description of the adult male and the female bird is exactly the same.

The face of a gray-brown masked woodswallow resembles a black mask.

How cute are they?

From their description, it is fair enough to say that these birds are very cute. Their round throat and soft feathers with their tiny tail make them very sweet and kind looking.

How do they communicate?

Masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) birds communicate with one and another in their flocks with a chatty call, and they usually get nervous and anxious when predators approach them by chirping out a harsh mobbing call. Males and females usually construct a small, flimsy, and cup-like nest, usually on a tree or a stump together. These birds are even known for their song. Similar to other birds, these birds sing sweet and melodious songs to express happy emotions.

How big is a masked woodswallow?

The masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) is only 7-7.9 in (18-20 cm) long. These birds are nearly half the size of a kestrel and almost as big as the mockingbird.

How fast can a masked woodswallow fly?

The exact masked woodswallow flying speed has not yet been determined. However, the masked woodswallow flight is swift and fast. This species belongs to some of the few Passerines that can soar high into the atmosphere. This makes their identification process easier.

How much does a masked woodswallow weigh?

The masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) is a very light weight bird. Its weight is only 1.3 oz (37 g). This bird is a bit bigger than the western bluebird and twice the size of the ovenbird.

What are the male and female names of the species?

No specific name is given to the masked woodswallow male or masked woodswallow female. However, the adult masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) can also be called langrayen masqué.

What would you call a baby masked woodswallow?

The masked woodswallow baby does not have a specific name. They may be called hatchlings.

What do they eat?

The masked woodswallow diet ideally consists of insects since this species is strictly insectivorous. They may in occasional situations eat fruit or even nectar from some garden flower.

Are they dangerous?

No, masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) birds are harmless creatures, especially towards humans. These birds flutter around in joy and stick together in a group. However, when they feel a predator approaching, they do scream out loud calls as a sign of warning.

Would they make a good pet?

Masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) birds may make good pets since they are very happy and cheerful and can sing a great song. However, it is best to let birds flutter around in their natural habitat instead of keeping them captive as pets. These birds enjoy the company of their flock. In fact, if you want one of these birds as a pet, then you will need to have more than just one.

Did you know...

The masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) has several names in several languages across the globe. Some of themare the personatus masked, hmyziar ciernohrdly, svartmaskad svalstare, ostrolot maskowy, maskenschwalbenstar, maskerspitsvogel and artamo enmascarado.

The name Artamus derives from the Greek word 'artamos' meaning 'butcher or murder'. These birds are named this because they have similarities with the carnivorous birds, shrikes. The group of birds under this genus were formerly called swallow-starlings.

Do masked woodswallows migrate?

The masked woodswallow migration process usually takes place around June in the north for winter following insect migration and abundance.

Are masked woodswallows endangered?

No, masked woodswallow (Artamus personatus) birds are not Endangered in any way. These woodswallows are nomadic and have a stable swallow population and are found in abundance in the masked woodswallow Australia belt.

Here at Kidadl, we have carefully created lots of interesting family-friendly animal facts for everyone to discover! Learn more about some other birds from our Hawaiian honeycreeper interesting facts and swallow-tailed kite fun facts pages.

You can even occupy yourself at home by coloring in one of our free printable ground woodpecker coloring pages.

Subscribe_Hero
Get The Kidadl Newsletter
1,000's of inspirational ideas direct to your inbox for things to do with your kids.

By joining Kidadl you agree to Kidadl’s Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and consent to receiving marketing communications from Kidadl.

EXPLORE KIDADL
In need of more inspiration?