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Kidadl Team

AUGUST 06, 2021

Patch-Nosed Snake: 21 Facts You Won't Believe!

To learn more about this snake, read these patch-nosed snake facts.

The patch-nosed snake (Salvadora hexalepis), western patch-nosed snake, belongs to the family Colubridae and genus Salvadora. It is known to be a non-venomous snake. The patch-nosed snake range map includes the southeastern or southwestern region of the United States and the states include California, Arizona, Nevada, the southern part of New Mexico, and Texas. This species is known to be also found in northern Mexico states such as  Chihuahua, Sinaloa, Baja California, and Sonora. The habitat of the patch-nosed snake consists of brushy areas in semi-arid regions, plains, rocky hillsides, and canyons. This snake is known to be very slender and has a dorsolateral stripe and lateral stripes on both sides. The anal plate is known to be divided and some scales are smooth. The diet or food of this animal includes amphibians and reptiles like lizards and other snakes and sometimes small mammals, too. There have been four subspecies of this snake species recognized and there are various types of patch-nosed snakes. The International Union for Conservation of Nature has listed the conservation status of the patch-nosed snake as Least Concern.

It is quite interesting to know about this species of snake and if you like these facts, read about the puff adder and gray rat snake, too.

Patch-Nosed Snake Interesting Facts

What type of animal is a patch-nosed snake?

The patch-nosed snake (Salvadora hexalepis) is a snake.

What class of animal does a patch-nosed snake belong to?

It belongs to the class of reptiles.

How many patch-nosed snakes are there in the world?

No exact number or count of the population of these reptiles has been recorded.  

Where does a patch-nosed snake live?

The population of these snakes is distributed in the southeastern and southwestern United States and the states include California, Arizona, Nevada, the southern part of New Mexico, and Texas. This species is known to be also found in northern Mexico, in states such as Chihuahua, Sinaloa, Baja California, and Sonora.

What is a patch-nosed snake's habitat?

The habitat of this snake consists of brushy areas in semi-arid regions, plains, rocky hillsides, and canyons.

Who do patch-nosed snakes live with?

Not much information is available about the Salvadora hexalepis, western patch-nosed snakes, or reptiles living alone or in groups.

How long does a patch-nosed snake live?

The lifespan of these snakes or reptiles is known to be around 14 years.

How do they reproduce?

Not enough information is available about the reproduction of this species of the snake but it has been recorded that around 4-10 eggs are laid in early summer or spring, probably between May to August and the eggs hatch around August to September.

What is their conservation status?

This species is placed under the Least Concern category of conservation status by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Patch-Nosed Snake Fun Facts

What do patch-nosed snakes look like?

This snake is known to be slender or thin and has a dorsolateral stripe and a very thin lateral stripe and this stripe is very dark on both sides. It has a triangular and large rostral scale. The anterior part of the posterior chin shields is known to be separated by two to three scales that are small. The dorsal scales are known to be smooth. Adult males are known to have scales above the vent which are keeled and also at the mid-body. The anal plate is known to be divided. This snake is also known to have a thick-curved scale on the top of the snout. All the subspecies are known to be yellowish in color with black stripes in varying or different arrangements.

The thin body, scale, and stripes of this snake are some of its recognizable features.

How cute are they?

Snakes are not considered cute by many people.

How do they communicate?

Very little information is available about the communication of this species of snakes but they are known to use auditory and tactile cues to communicate, and sometimes chemical cues too.

How big is a patch-nosed snake?

The length of this snake ranges from about 20-46 in (51–117 cm). It can be slightly larger than a cat snake and can be smaller than a black rat snake.

How fast can a patch-nosed snake move?

The exact speed of this western patch-nosed snake (Salvadora hexalepis) is unknown but they are known to be quite fast-moving snakes.

How much does a patch-nosed snake weigh?

The weight of the western patch-nosed snake (Salvadora hexalepis) is unknown.

What are the male and female names of the species?

There are no specific names for a male and female of the species.

What would you call a baby patch-nosed snake?

While there is no particular name for a baby of this species, it can be referred to as a hatchling.

What do they eat?

The diet or food of the western patch-nosed snake (Salvadora hexalepis) consists of amphibians and reptiles like other snakes, lizards, small rodents and mice, and reptile eggs, and sometimes small mammals, too.

Are they poisonous?

This snake is known to be a non-venomous species of snake.

Would they make a good pet?

Not much information is available about these snakes as pets. Since they are non-venomous, it could be possible that they are pets.

Did you know...

This snake is known to be diurnal, that is, it is active during the daylight – even during times of extreme heat.

It is a terrestrial reptile but it has been observed that it can or tends to climb shrubs in pursuit or search of prey.

The burrows are created in loose soils.

This snake is known to have acute vision that helps it to escape quickly or rapidly and makes itself difficult or challenging to spot or capture, even in the day.

When this snake is cornered, it is known to inflate its body and strike.

Four subspecies of this snake have been recognized, namely: Salvadora hexalepis hexalepis, Salvadora hexalepis klauberi, Salvadora hexalepis mojavensis, and Salvadora hexalepis virgultea.

The subspecies Salvadora hexalepis virgultea is known to be a new subspecies of this snake.

Some consider five subspecies of this snake and the fifth one is known as Salvadora hexalepsis deserticola, which some taxonomists describe as a unique species.  

Some other types of patch-nosed snake or snakes of the genus Salvadora include: coast-patch-nosed snake, Mojave patch-nosed snake, desert patch-nosed snake, mountain patch-nosed snake, Arizona patch-nosed snake, and eastern patch-nosed snake.

Is the patch-nosed snake endangered?

The patch-nosed snake is not an Endangered species.

How did the patch-nosed snake get its name?

It is believed that these snakes or reptiles get their name due to a patch on the front of their nose or snout.

Here at Kidadl, we have carefully created lots of interesting family-friendly animal facts for everyone to discover! Learn more about some other reptiles from our black mamba facts and vine snake facts pages.

You can even occupy yourself at home by drawing coloring in one of our Patch-Nosed Snake coloring pages.

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