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Pine Barrens Treefrog: 21 Facts You Won't Believe!

To learn more about this frog, read these pine barrens treefrog facts.

The pine barrens treefrog (Hyla andersonii) is a member of the Hylidae family. The distribution of this frog population occurs in the Sandhills of North and South Carolina, New Jersey Pine Barrens, and pool bogs in southern Alabama and Florida panhandle range from the southeastern U.S. The habitat of these frogs includes brushy areas, near or around ponds that are shallow, and peat bogs or similar types of habitat. The male pine barrens treefrog call begins as the temperature gets warm and this call is produced from the ground or vegetation. Females are known to lay eggs singly and not in the entire clutch to avoid losing eggs. The fertilization of the eggs is done by males. The natural pine barrens treefrog life cycle includes the hatching of eggs, the development of a tadpole, and further maturation. The body is bright green colored with a stripe that is lavender or plum-colored with orange patches on the inner parts of the legs. The dorsal part is green while the ventral side or part is white in color. Due to the coloration, these frogs camouflage well in the vegetation. Male treefrogs are known to be larger than females. They are known to have sticky toe pads. The calling or call is known to be quick and nasal. These populations of these amphibian species are not Endangered but placed under the Near Threatened status – due to habitat loss – by the IUCN.

It is quite interesting to know about this species of treefrog and if you are interested, read about a frog and a tree frog, too.

Pine Barrens Treefrog Interesting Facts

What type of animal is a pine barrens treefrog?

Pine barrens treefrog is a frog.

What class of animal does a pine barrens treefrog belong to?

Pine barrens treefrog (Hyla andersonii) belongs to the class of Amphibia.

How many pine barrens treefrogs are there in the world?

There is no exact count or a specific number of the Endangered population of these pine barrens treefrogs recorded or estimated in the world.

Where does a pine barrens treefrog live?

The distribution of this pine barrens treefrog occurs throughout the three areas or range that consists of the southeastern United States that include the Sandhills of North and South Carolina, New Jersey Pine Barrens, and pool bogs of southern Alabama and Florida panhandle.

What is a pine barrens treefrog's habitat?

The most common or preferred habitat range of this treefrog is brushy areas, near or around ponds and such surfaces that are shallow, and peat bogs, cranberry bogs. Types of habitat with thick moss carpet as commonly inhabited. These treefrogs require an acidic type of environment or habitat as they are known to be tolerant to lower levels of pH.

Who do pine barrens treefrogs live with?

Not much is known about this treefrog living in groups or alone.

How long does a pine barrens treefrog live?

Pine barrens treefrogs are known to live for about two to five years.

How do they reproduce?

Males begin to produce callings when temperatures are warm and there is increased rainfall, that is, around early May. Adults or specifically males are known to call from grounds and vegetation. These treefrogs are found in ground covers and perching on trees during the day and come out at night for foraging during the breeding season. Females are known to lay eggs singly and not in the entire clutch to avoid losing eggs. The eggs are fertilized by males. The eggs are known to hatch into tadpoles within one to weeks. Tadpoles develop into tailed froglets in around 80-100 days. After this transformation or development, the young frogs or the juvenile pine barrens treefrog scatter in wet meadows and woods just like adults.

What is their conservation status?

The pine barrens treefrog population is placed under the Near Threatened category by the IUCN.

Pine Barrens Treefrog Fun Facts

What do pine barrens treefrogs look like?

Males are known to be larger than females. These frogs have a bright green-colored body with lavender or plum-colored broad stripes bordered with white color and this stripe is known to extend from the snout. The inner femur and the groin are known to have orange-colored patches and these patches get concealed or hidden when these frogs are sitting or resting. The dorsal part of the body is green, while the ventral side or part of the body is white in color. Due to their coloration, these frogs camouflage well in the vegetation. The mouth of females is known to be edged or bordered with white and there are green patches also bordered with white present on both the sides of the throat. The feet of these frogs are known to have sticky pads on all the fingers which help to provide grip on trees.

The color and stripe of this frog and orange patches on certain hidden parts of the legs are one of its identifying features.

How cute are they?

This species, that is, pine barrens treefrog is considered to be one of the beautiful amphibians in New Jersey because of its vibrant colors.

How do they communicate?

The pine barrens treefrog or treefrog, in general, are known to produce various sounds and calls to communicate with each other. The call or calling sounds like 'quonk-quonk' and is known to be quite fast and nasal. The rate of the repetition of the sound is around 25 times in 20 seconds.  

How big is a pine barrens treefrog?

The length of the pine barrens treefrog (Hyla andersonii) ranges from 1-3 in (25-76 mm). It is known to be quite smaller than a common frog or a pool frog.

How fast can a pine barrens treefrog move?

The exact speed of the pine barrens treefrog is unknown.

How much does a pine barrens treefrog weigh?

The weight of this species is unknown.

What are the male and female names of the species?

There are no specific names for a male and female of this species.

What would you call a baby pine barrens treefrog?

A baby pine barrens treefrog is called a tadpole.

What do they eat?

The food or diet of this pine barrens treefrog mainly consists of ants, beetles, flies, slugs, moths and butterflies, and some other small insects.

Are they poisonous?

This barren treefrog is not considered poisonous.

Would they make a good pet?

Not much information is available about this pine barrens treefrog but if kept as pets, a special kind of pine barrens treefrog enclosure or habitat is required.

Kidadl Advisory: All pets should only be bought from a reputable source. It is recommended that as a potential pet owner you carry out your own research prior to deciding on your pet of choice. Being a pet owner is very rewarding but it also involves commitment, time and money. Ensure that your pet choice complies with the legislation in your state and/or country. You must never take animals from the wild or disturb their habitat. Please check that the pet you are considering buying is not an endangered species, or listed on the CITES list, and has not been taken from the wild for the pet trade.

Did you know...

This is known to be a species of the New World treefrog.

They are named so because they inhabit or occur in New Jersey Pine Barrens.

Pine Barrens of New Jersey is known to provide habitats for various Endangered species like the pine barrens treefrog, timber rattlesnake.

Pine barrens treefrogs are known to have fewer natural predators and thus, it is believed that they are not very fast-moving creatures.  

Most of their time is spent resting in the forest brushes.

The conservation or protection of these pine barrens treefrog is important as the pools these treefrogs inhabit or occur in are being used up or destroyed for development, some pools are dried up or drained and this leads to the loss of habitat for these species of treefrogs and thus, to preserve or save these treefrogs, the pools or habitats of these frogs must be preserved like in the sandhills and peat bogs.

The calling or call of the pine barrens treefrog is known to be natural, rapid, or quick and nasal and sounds like 'quonk-quonk'.

Is the pine barrens treefrog Endangered?

This species is not Endangered, but Near Threatened. This species was considered to be Endangered by the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service and when more population was found in the Florida panhandle, their status of conservation of the whole population was updated to Near Threatened. The main or the major threat that it faces is habitat loss due to pollution of the ponds inhabited by this species. Not much information is available about what is being done to protect this species.

What survival mechanism does the pine barrens treefrog have?

Not much information is available about the survival mechanism of this treefrog but they are known to hide in vegetation or perch in trees during the day and forage at night.

Here at Kidadl, we have carefully created lots of interesting family-friendly animal facts for everyone to discover! For more relatable content, check out these red-eyed tree frog facts and poison frog facts pages.

You can even occupy yourself at home by coloring in one of our Pine Barrens Treefrog coloring pages.

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