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Kidadl Team

SEPTEMBER 09, 2021

Queensland School Mackerel: 17 Facts You Won’t Believe

Discover interesting Queensland school mackerel facts about this fish that is also known as a doggie mackerel.

The Queensland school mackerel or scientifically, Scomberomorus queenslandicus, is a marine fish that is endemic to the inshore and coastal waters of northern and eastern Australia as well as southern Papua New Guinea. Also known as the doggy mackerel or blotched mackerel, this fish species is often fished for recreational purposes as well as commercial purposes and is considered to be an excellent table fish. This species of fish is often mistaken for other types of fish. This is because it greatly resembles a small Spanish mackerel but with unique large gray spots towards the back of its body. It was also misplaced in fisheries as the Indo-Pacific king mackerel (Scomberomorus guttatus). This school mackerel lives for around 10 years. They feed on a range of water animals unlike their similar counterpart, the spotted mackerel, that feeds largely on baitfish like anchovies, marine fishes, and shrimp. These fish, in fact, follow the line of their prey along bays and estuaries. T

he males and the females of this species take the same time to mature which is about one to two years. Unlike other mackerels that migrate annually, this fish species from the Scombridae family usually prefers to stay along the coast and go to a depth of 98.4-328 ft (30-100 m) in water. They have an extremely elongate body which is slim and extremely tapered towards the end. The body of this mackerel consists of small scales and a lateral line gradually curving down to a caudal peduncle. Overall, they have quite an average length. The specific name 'queenslandicus' refers to the locality they are often fished from.

If you'd like to learn more about similar fishes, check out our facts about Spanish mackerel and Indian mackerel that you are sure to enjoy!

Queensland School Mackerel Interesting Facts

What type of animal is a Queensland school mackerel?

The Queensland school mackerel, similar to the spotted mackerel, is a type of fish that belongs to the Scombridae family and comes from the Scomberomorus genus. These fishes are largely fished for recreational and commercial purposes.

What class of animal does a Queensland school mackerel belong to?

This marine mackerel belongs to the class of fish, specifically Actinopterygii, and is endemic to the inshore as well as coastal waters of Western Australia and southern Papua New Guinea.

How many Queensland school mackerels are there in the world?

It is not known at the moment how many fishes of this species exist in the world but given their conservation status by the IUCN, which is Least Concern, the range and distribution of this marine species is quite stable and their population does not face many threats.

Where does a Queensland school mackerel live?

The range of these fish with considerable length is believed to be in tropical waters especially along the coast and inshore. They also live in the pelagic regions of the western Pacific Ocean.

What is a Queensland school mackerel's habitat?

The Queensland school mackerel (Scomberomorus queenslandicus) is a marine species of fish in the family Scombridae. This pelagic fish is frequently fished for commercial as well as recreational purposes. Often referred to as the doggie mackerel, they are constantly confused with the Indo-Pacific king mackerel and the Spanish mackerel too.

Who does the Queensland school mackerel live with?

This fish species of standard length has their distribution in northern Australia and southern Papua New Guinea and they tend to live in groups or flocks. This is why they are referred to as a mackerel school!

How long does a Queensland school mackerel live?

The Queensland school mackerel which is native to northern Australia and southern Papua New Guinea lives for about 10 years, just like all other mackerel species!

How do they reproduce?

Since they belong to the same mackerel species, these fishes reproduce through external fertilization. The female Queensland school mackerel lays about 300,000-1,500,000 eggs. These eggs will float in the water as they have oily drops. Sometimes, only a small percentage of these eggs hatch since they are targeted as food by many sea creatures. The larvae are miniature at birth and at a later stage in their lives, these young ones eat tons of zooplankton. They finally look like miniature mackerels at a length of 2 in (5.1 cm)

What is their conservation status?

The conservation status of this marine fish species that is often fished for commercial and recreational purposes has been listed as Least Concern by the IUCN. The population of this species does not face any threats and their range, as well as distribution, exists in stable numbers.

Queensland School Mackerel Fun Facts

What does the Queensland school mackerel look like?

This fish species of length 51.1 in (129.7 cm) is quite similar to the spotted mackerel. Also called the doggie mackerel, the Queensland school mackerel has certain spots on its back and is covered in small scales. Towards the caudal peduncle, there is a lateral line that curves downward. Often found in coastal waters as well inshore, this marine species can go up to a depth of 98.4-328 ft (30-100 m) in water. These fishes were often sold in fisheries as Indo-Pacific king mackerel.

The body of the school mackerel is extremely tapered towards the end, allowing them to move swiftly in water.
* We've been unable to source an image of Queensland school mackerel and have used an image of a jack mackerel instead. If you are able to provide us with a royalty-free image of Queensland school mackerel, we would be happy to credit you. Please contact us at [email protected]

 

How cute are they?

This marine species, which people usually fish for recreational and commercial purposes, is not very cute. They have a plain look to them and no vibrancy or color, making them look dull.

How do they communicate?

Like all fish species, the marine Queensland school mackerel whose distribution is found along the coast and inshore of northern Australia communicates using gesture and motion as well as electric pulses. They are also known to release chemicals into the water that could be sensed by smell or taste.

How big is a Queensland school mackerel?

This mackerel species found along the coast of northern Australia, often following the prey into bays and estuaries, is about 51.1 in (129.7 cm) in length!

How fast can a Queensland school mackerel swim?

This mackerel species of northern Australia and southern Papua New Guinea is built to be speedy swimmers. The forked tail helps them in streamlining themselves and retracting their dorsal fin boosts their speed. The exact speed at which this marine species swims is not known but they are very quick in the water.

How much does a Queensland school mackerel weigh?

This fish, which is often found in the waters of the western Pacific Ocean, weighs about 26.8 lb (12.1 kg), about the same as a Chinese water deer and a Pacarana.

What are the male and female names of the species?

There are no particular male or female names for this marine species that are native to northern Australia and southern Papua New Guinea. They are simply called by their regular name which is Queensland school mackerel or scientifically, Scomberomorus queenslandicus. This mackerel comes from the Scombridae family and belongs to the Scomberomorus genus.

What would you call a baby Queensland school mackerel?

A baby Queensland school mackerel is called a spike, blinker, or tinker. It's the same for all baby mackerels!

What do they eat?

These marine fishes are piscivorous. This means that they eat small fishes like anchovies, crustaceans, shrimp, small sardines, clupeids, and marine worms.

Are they dangerous?

These fishes of length 51.1 in (129.7 cm) from northern Australia and southern Papua New Guinea, which are often fished for commercial and recreational purposes, are not dangerous and do not pose any threat to humans.

Would they make a good pet?

All species of mackerels are meant for consumption. Therefore, even the Queensland school mackerel is a fish that is meant for consumption and not for the purpose of pets. Furthermore, the nature of these fishes would not make them exciting pets at home.

Did you know...

This mackerel species can reach up to a length of 12-22 in (30.4-55.8 cm) and a weight of 4-10 lb (1.8-4.5 kg), the same as a domestic house cat!

The best way to cook mackerel is by pan-frying, baking, roasting, or barbecuing. It has a similar flaky texture to tuna, so it is a great substitute in salads, pasta, or sandwiches.

How did Queensland school mackerels get its name?

The Queensland school mackerel of length 51.1 in (129.7 cm) got its name from the locality they were usually found in large numbers, which is Queensland on the east coast of Australia. This is why it has also been adopted into its scientific name which is 'queenslandicus'.

How do you identify Queensland school mackerels?

These fish have large gray spots on the back of its body. They, however, begin to fade once they are caught. They were often confused for the Indo-Pacific king mackerel and were sold in fisheries under that name.

Here at Kidadl, we have carefully created lots of interesting family-friendly animal facts for everyone to discover! For more relatable content, check out these white tuna facts and  Atlantic mackerel facts for kids.

You can even occupy yourself at home by coloring in one of our free printable Queensland school mackerel coloring pages.

Second image by Aleph1.

*We've been unable to source an image of Queensland school mackerel and have used an image of a jack mackerel instead as the main age. If you are able to provide us with a royalty-free image of Queensland school mackerel, we would be happy to credit you. Please contact us at [email protected] 

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