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17 Amaze-wing Facts About The Sumichrast's Wren For Kids

Read some amazing Sumichrast's wren facts to know more about this monotypic species of the slender-billed wren

Among the lightest species of birds of the world, wrens have a global population varying within 35-44 colorful subspecies around the world. A Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) is yet another species of wren that is endemic to Mexico. With a wide range of habitats including evergreen forests, semi-deciduous forest, limestone (karst) lowlands, and coffee plantations, this bird is also found in adjacent regions of central Veracruz and northern Oaxaca.

This bird was first documented by an American businessman George Newbold Lawrence in 1871. While it is speculated to be monotypic, the Nava's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti navai) was considered a subspecies of the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) until it was documented as yet another monotypic species as Hylorchilus navai under the same genus Hylorchilus. The bird has several vernacular names around the world such as slender-billed wren, troglodyte à bec fin in French, and saltapared cuevero in Mexican Spanish. It belongs to the family of Troglodytidae with the scientific name of the family originating from the common behavior of these birds of the world. This typical behavior is constructing nests and probing using their slender bill near the ground in caves and crevices. These birds are small with a dark brown plumage with a slender bill, and strong legs and feet.

If the uniqueness of the dingy skipper makes you interested to read more about similar species, you can read about the red-backed shrike and the mountain chickadee.

Sumichrast's Wren Interesting Facts

What type of animal is a Sumichrast's wren?

A Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) is a slender-billed songbird from the order Passeriformes. It is a monotypic species of the wren and is closely related to Nava's wren. It was first documented in 1871 and is considered endemic to Mexico and adjacent states of central Veracruz and northern Oaxaca. It is a local bird mostly found in areas having extensive limestone (karst) outcroppings.

What class of animal does a Sumichrast's wren belong to?

The Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) belongs to the kingdom Animalia, class Aves, order Passeriformes, family Troglodytidae, and genus Hylorchilus.

How many Sumichrast's wrens are there in the world?

While the estimated population of the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) is not quantified, the population of this bird is speculated to be threatened as the conservation status of the bird is listed as Near Threatened under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The range of these birds is threatened due to habitat loss and destruction.

Where does a Sumichrast's wren live?

The distribution of the population of Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) is reported to be endemic to Mexico and the regions of central Veracruz and northern Oaxaca. It is a local bird with limestone lowlands as the most favorable habitat. While these birds of the world are speculated to be either migratory or partially migratory, no data confirms whether the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) migrates or not.

What is a Sumichrast's wren's habitat?

The Sumichrast's wren habitat range is around humid evergreen forests, deciduous forests, limestone lowlands, and coffee plantations. Also, the data highlighted that the distribution of the population of the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) appears at an elevation range from 246-3281 ft (75-1000 m). The sightings of these local birds has made us believe that they reside near the ground. Also, the Sumichrast's wren nest appears in caves and crevices

Who do Sumichrast's wrens live with?

Sightings of species of wrens are rare and are rarely heard. Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) sightings are also not too common common speculating that the bird leads a solitary life. Often during the breeding season, these birds of the world are spotted in pairs with their potential mates.

How long does a Sumichrast's wren live?

Different species of wrens are known to live for two years on average. The Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) does not have a recorded life span.

How do they reproduce?

While there is only limited data recorded about the reproduction mechanism, the nest of the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) is recorded near the ground during May. Also, both the male and female species of birds may gather material to build the nest like grass, roots, and other things, but the female is speculated to build it. The female bird lays up to three eggs and incubates the Sumichrast's wren egg, while the male bird brings food for the nestling and female. Grooming the young birds is a shared responsibility of both sexes.

What is their conservation status?

While many birds of the world are at risk of extinction, various steps are been taken to ensure the conservation of several global species facing a rapid decline in their population. The conservation status of the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) is listed as Near Threatened under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. This species is at risk due to habitat loss and destruction. Limestone lowlands are the favorable habitat of this bird. Limestone is considered poor for cultivation and thethe land the rather is either left spare for cattle pasture or converted to maize fields. Such practices challenging the survival of the birds.

Sumichrast's Wren Fun Facts

What do Sumichrast's wrens look like?

The Sumichrast's wren appearance is quite similar to the Nava's wren, a bird belonging to the same genus. The Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) has brown plumage with a buff chin and throat. Also, the breast of the bird is recorded to have dark fainted bars and the belly has irregular white tiny spots. The Sumichrast's wren beak is slender and long as the birds are called names such as the slender-billed wren. Similarly, the baby bird has dark underparts with fainter markings on its belly and breast.

* We've been unable to source an image of Sumichrast's wren and have used an image of Nava's wren instead. If you are able to provide us with a royalty-free image of Sumichrast's wren, we would be happy to credit you. Please contact us at [email protected]

It is a bird with a brown crown, thin-long bill, and pale gray-brown plumage with a green iridescence.

How cute are they?

The Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) is considered one of the most adorable birds of the world due to its small size and dark plumage.

How do they communicate?

These birds of the world, belonging to the order Passeriformes, are speculated to be songbirds. Similarly, the Sumichrast's wren male sings in a series of loud high-pitched whistles and the song of the Sumichrast's wren female is similar to a phrase comprising a single repeated syllable. Also, the call of the species of Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) sounds like 'piu-piu-piu'.

How big is a Sumichrast's wren?

The length of the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) ranges from 6-6.5 in (15-16.5 cm). It is one of the smallest species of bird around the world but is not as small as a bee hummingbird.

How fast can a Sumichrast's wren fly?

The flying speed of the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) is unrecorded. These birds are found at an elevation range from 246-3281 ft (75-1000 m).

How much does a Sumichrast's wren weigh?

The species of birds, the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti), weighs up to 1 oz (28 g).

What are the male and female names of the species?

The male and female species of the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) do not have names specific to their sex. These birds have a range of vernacular names in various languages around the world such as the slender-billed wren, troglodyte à bec fin in French, aaltapared cuevero in Mexican Spanish, and many other names are assigned to this species.

What would you call a baby Sumichrast's wren?

A Sumichrast's wren baby is given several names such as chick, juvenile bird, nestling, hatchling, or fledging.

What do they eat?

The Sumichrast's wren diet comprises small plants, arthropods, invertebrates like snails, worms, or flying insects.

Are they dangerous?

No, the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus Sumichrasti) is a predator but does not possess danger.

Would they make a good pet?

Whether the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus Sumichrasti) can be petted or not is still a conundrum, as the bird is not reported in captivity around the world. However, these birds should be allowed to live freely in the wild.

Did you know...

The Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) has a small range and a limited population that is Near Threatened.

How did the Sumichrast's wrens get their name?

The Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) is named after the Mexican naturalist, Francis Sumichrast. The Sumichrast's wren name honors the Mexican naturalist for his commendable work. It also has several vernacular names in various languages around the world.

How do you identify a Sumichrast's wren?

Identifying a specific bird among the 10,000 species of birds around the world may be a challenging task but every species is unique. Similarly, the Sumichrast's wren (Hylorchilus sumichrasti) can be identified easily as it is endemic to Mexico and adjacent states. It is pretty rare around the world. Also, the brown plumage with a long bill and a gray mark on its cheek are unique to this monotypic bird from the genus Hylorchilus.

Here at Kidadl, we have carefully created lots of interesting family-friendly animal facts for everyone to discover! Learn more about some other birds from our canyon wren facts and blue jay facts pages.

You can even occupy yourself at home by coloring in one of our free printable Sumichrast's wren coloring pages.

Main image by Panza Rayada

Second image by Francesco Veronesi

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