FOR KIDS AGED 4-12

Battersea Zoo: Everything You Need To Know About Reopening

A monkey at Battersea Zoo London

The day has finally arrived! Battersea Zoo has opened its gates and is ready to welcome families back for some fun times in the city.

Located at Chelsea Bridge Gate in London, this popular day out for children is back open. But like everything else that's opening up, with the lockdown restrictions lifting there are some new precautions to be aware of while planning your big day out with the kids.

We have done the research to give you a handy guide of all the things you need to know before you visit Battersea Children's Zoo.

Book Online

Many park and outdoor facilities across London and the UK in general have adopted an online booking system. This is because in order to keep compliant with social distancing policies there is only a certain number of people allowed in at the Zoo at a time. You are allowed to get your tickets at the door but to avoid having to wait in queues with impatient children, we recommend you book your place online!

Ticket Pricing: Child £7.95, Adult £9.95. Family deals are available.

Accessibility: Battersea Park Zoo is buggy and wheelchair friendly. They offer a discounted ticket deal for those who are disabled and their carers, visit their website for more information.

Keep Your Distance!

Boy and girl wearing masks spraying hand sanitiser

Just like other venues throughout London, Battersea Park Zoo has created a one way route for parents and children to map their journey. Once you get inside you will see a clear path to guide you throughout the zoo. Battersea Park also asks that you comply with social distancing, staying at least two  metres apart from anyone else you may encounter during your visit.

Masks are not mandatory while you and your children are out and about in the zoo. As long as you are in the open air, you do not have to wear a mask however if you want to buy something from the gift shop or get some refreshments from the takeaway cafe you must wear a mask to do so. This is just to ensure your own safety, as well as that of the staff and anyone else who takes a trip to the zoo.

Cashless Payment

Another thing to be aware of is that the Zoo is not taking cash payments. To maximise clean hygiene practices and reduce hand to hand contact, Battersea Park Zoo asks that all customers use contact free methods of payment while on the premises.

Food And Drink

boys playing together
Image © Ashton Bingham on Unsplash

The cafe at Battersea Park Zoo has reopened but, like most food and drink venues across London, it is currently serving takeaway only. However, there are picnic benches situated across Battersea Park Zoo so children and adults alike can enjoy a nice alfresco lunch surrounded by the company of the animals.

There are also hand sanitiser dispensers all around the map to make it easy for all adults and children to keep their hands clean periodically. This is really important to stop the spread of any germs or bacteria you and the kids may have picked up along the journey.

The toilets dotted all over the map are all open as usual, again they ask for you and the kids to follow social distancing rules just like in other public bathroom facilities all across London. There are also baby changing facilities should you need them.

No Keeper Talks

Zookeepers at Battersea Zoo feeding kangeroos
Image © Battersea Zoo

In order to reduce crowding and multiple people gathering in one area the daily keeper talks across the Zoo have been cancelled for now. However the keepers will be all around the park (take a look at the map to try and find them) to answer any questions you and your kids may have about the animals.

To make up for a lack of live talks there is a number of brand new virtual keeper talks stationed around Battersea Park Zoo that you can access with your phone! Using QR code technology you and the children can play the talks at any time of day and still learn some fun facts about the animals while being safe and socially distanced.

Enjoy Yourselves!

goat looking over a fence
Image © Kaleb Tobb on Unsplash

With these regulations in mind, all that's left is for you and your children to have fun! Here are a few fun features for you to see on your big day out.

Check out the farm stables where you can see animals like donkeys, horses, chinchillas and more! It's not quite back to being a petting zoo but children can still say hello and interact with the animals from a distance. There are also two open play areas where the children can let their wild side out in a safe and socially distanced way.

Don't forget to learn about their conservation projects! This London farm park takes part in many projects to help conserve different species of plants and animals alike. Keep your eye out for the two endangered species that call this place their home: the Black-Capped Squirrel Monkey and the Emperor Tamarin Monkey. This day out isn't just about oohing and aahing at the different animals, although that is a big part, at Battersea Park children are encouraged to care about the environment and all living creatures in it.

How to Get There

Parking: There are three pay-and-display parking lots near the zoo. The closest is found through Chelsea Gate and is just a short two minute walk to the zoo.

Nearest Station: The nearest train station is Queenstown Road. The park is 300 metres to the left of the exit of the station.

Author

Written By

Megan Wynne

Living in Dublin, Megan is passionate about all things creative. Currently studying Art in university, when she’s not experimenting with paint and photography you can find her in the cinema enjoying the newest films. She loves spending time with her two younger sisters, exploring nature and finding fun things to do in the city.

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