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15 Facts About Kayentavenator, Dinosaurs From Early Jurassic Period

Contents

Kayentavenator elysiae (Kayenta Hunter) is a species of carnivore that lived in the Kayenta Formation. This particular species can be dated back to the Early Jurassic period. Based on the fossils discovered, they were rather small in size. Some claim that this particular species of dinosaurs preyed on other armored dinosaurs like the Scuttelosaurus and Scelidosaurus.

Very little information is available about these animals from prehistoric wildlife. However, since they were carnivores, it can be safely assumed that they were rather aggressive by nature, especially when it came to hunting down their prey. If you are interested in actually learning about other similar species of dinosaurs, you can read the book by Alfred Sherwood Romer, named 'Vertebrate Paleontology'.

Kayentavenator Interesting Facts

How do you pronounce 'Kayentavenator'?

Kayentavenator can be a tricky word to say. Therefore, while pronouncing it, you can just break the word into 'Kah-yen-tah-veh-nay-ter'.

What type of dinosaur was a Kayentavenator?

This particular species of dinosaur is a carnivorous tetanuran dinosaur.

In which geological period did the Kayentavenator roam the Earth?

According to historical evidence, this species walked the Earth during the Early Jurassic Period.

When did the Kayentavenator become extinct?

Not much is known about when this species of early Mesozoic theropods became extinct for the first time. In general, all species of dinosaurs are known to have become extinct almost 65 million years ago.

Where did Kayentavenator live?

The fossils of this particular dinosaur were discovered from the Kayenta Formation. Therefore, it can be safely assumed that it inhabited the regions of Northern Arizona, to be more specific. The plant life of this region included petrified wood.

What was the Kayentavenator's habitat?

This species mostly inhabited terrestrial habitat environments with a seasonal climate. It shared its habitat with various other theropods and armored dinosaurs as well.

Who did the Kayentavenator live with?

Kayentavenator mostly lived in the regions of what we know today as Northern Arizona. Some of the other species of dinosaurs that lived alongside the Kayentavenator include theropods like Dilophosaurus, as well as armored dinosaurs like the Scuttelosaurus and Scelidosaurus.

How long did a Kayentavenator live?

Not much is really known about the lifespan of this particular species that inhabited the lands of North America.

How did they reproduce?

Like all other species of dinosaurs, Kayentavenator too reproduced by laying eggs.

Kayentavenator Fun Facts

What did the Kayentavenator look like?

The fossils that were discovered of this new species were that of juveniles. Therefore, the body size of an adult of this species is still not known. All that was discovered after studying the fossil remains was that it was a small-sized species of carnivores. The length of the juvenile might have been 1.6 ft (0.48 m) high at the hip.

Kayentavenator were small-sized carnivores.

 

 

How many bones did a Kayentavenator have?

The whole skeleton fossil of this species is yet to be discovered. Therefore, the exact number of bones possessed by this dinosaur is not yet known. Some of the fossils that were discovered of this particular dinosaur include parts of the vertebrae, pelvis, and partial hindlimb.

How did they communicate?

Not much information is available regarding how these species communicated with each other. However, in general, Sdinosaurs communicated largely through sound and body language.

How big was the Kayentavenator?

Kayentavenator was rather a small-sized species of carnivores. From the fossils that have been discovered, it is known to be 1.6 ft (0.48 m) high at the hip, which is almost half the size of a modern tiger. However, the fossils were that of a juvenile. Therefore, the full adult size of this species has not yet been discovered.

How fast could a Kayentavenator move?

Very little is known about the speed of this dinosaur. However, since this particular species from North America was a small-sized carnivore, it can be safely assumed that it was quite fast to hunt down other small-sized dinosaurs.

How much did a Kayentavenator weigh?

The exact weight of this species of dinosaur is yet to be found.

What were the male and female names of the species?

There are no sex-specific names for this species of dinosaur or any other species of dinosaurs.

What would you call a baby Kayentavenator?

Almost all species of dinosaurs, including Kayentavenator, reproduced by laying eggs. Therefore a baby Kayentavenator can be called a hatchling or a juvenile.

How aggressive were they?

Many researchers claim that this particular species might have preyed on Scuttelosaurus and Scelidosaurus, who shared the same habitat as Kayentavenator. Since they were carnivores, it can be safely presumed that they were rather aggressive by nature, especially when it came to hunting down their prey.

Did You Know…

An interesting fact about Kayentavenator is that when the fossils of this particular species were discovered, researchers were confused about the genus of this species. One claimed that Kayentavenator shared the same genus as M. Kayentakatae. However, later the claim was dismissed since the M. Kayentakatae lacked the public fenestra and the sharp ridge on the tibia, which was found Kayentavenator.

The scientific name of this particular species from the Kayenta formation is Kayentavenator elysiae. The name Kayentavenator roughly translates into kayenta hunter.

 

*We've been unable to source an image of Kayentavenator and have used an image of Prenoceratops instead. If you are able to provide us with a royalty-free image of Kayentavenator, we would be happy to credit you. Please contact us at [email protected]

*We've been unable to source an image of Kayentavenator and have used an image of Avaceratops instead. If you are able to provide us with a royalty-free image of Kayentavenator, we would be happy to credit you. Please contact us at [email protected]

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