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Fun Toolache Wallaby Facts For Kids

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The toolache wallaby, or Gray's wallaby, belonged to the Macropus genus and is presumed to be Extinct. Certain inconclusive pieces of evidence state that the species have been sighted in the corner of Australia. Extensive research is still being conducted to confirm this. The last known toolache wallaby died in captivity in 1939. Habitat loss and several other threats caused their decline. This species had a lot of distinct features like their black forearms, feet, and tips of the ears, the pale ashy brown belt with a buff-yellow underbelly, and a mark on its face that reached from its nose to the head. Wallabies had a head that was similar to that of a kangaroo. The toolache wallaby occupied South Australia and southwestern Victoria. Their preferred habitat ranged from swampy grassland areas to taller grassed areas. This graceful and elegant creature was hunted by humans for its pale ashy brown pelt with a buff sheen. Toolache wallabies were known to be sociable creatures who lived peacefully with fellow mates and other animals but were largely hunted by predators like red foxes. They were seen resting and grazing in groups. The last wild sightings were recorded in 1924. Sadly, the toolache wallaby only survived for a few years after the European occupation.

To learn more about toolache wallabies keep reading and do check out our other articles on tree kangaroo facts and red kangaroo facts.

Toolache Wallaby Interesting Facts

What type of animal is a toolache wallaby?

The toolache wallaby, or Gray's wallaby (Macropus greyi), is an extinct species of a wallaby that belonged to the Macropodidae family. It was a marsupial that occupied the forest areas from South Australia to the western regions of Victoria.

What class of animal does a toolache wallaby belong to?

The toolache wallaby belongs to the Mammalia class of the Animalia kingdom.

How many toolache wallabies are there in the world?

The toolache wallaby (Macropus greyi) is an extinct species. The last known toolache wallaby survived in captivity until 1939. A combination of numerous threats caused the decline of this species.

Where does a toolache wallaby live?

The toolache wallaby occupied specific regions of South Australia and southwestern Victoria.

What is a toolache wallaby's habitat?

Their preferred habitat ranged from swampy short grassland areas to taller grassed regions that were spread from South Australia to the western part of Victoria. Toolache wallaby occupied dense forest regions.

Who do toolache wallabies live with?

Toolache wallabies were known to be sociable creatures who lived in groups. They were seen resting and grazing in mobs consisting of as many as 50 individuals. They were very social and friendly, unlike certain species of wallaby.

How long does a toolache wallaby live?

Toolache wallabies only survived for a few years compared to similar marsupials, up to around 14 years. The minimum lifespan was 11 years.

How do they reproduce?

The toolache wallaby, or Gray's wallaby, was a viviparous animal that reproduced by giving birth to live offspring. Once the egg is fertilized within the body of the female it takes a month to release the offspring. Once the baby comes out of the opening at the end of its tail, it immediately crawls up to the pouch. The newborn is extremely underdeveloped and small. Their arms are the only partially developed limb.

What is their conservation status?

Gray's wallaby, Macropus greyi, was a species from South Australia and southwestern Victoria. It is listed as extinct although extensive research is still being conducted to prove otherwise. The last wild sightings were recorded in 1924.

Toolache Wallaby Fun Facts 

What do toolache wallabies look like?

We've been unable to source an image of a toolache wallaby and have used an image of a Bennett's wallaby instead. If you are able to provide us with a royalty-free image of a toolache wallaby, we would be happy to credit you. Please contact us at [email protected]

Bennett's wallaby is a close genus member of the toolache wallaby.

Toolache wallabies had a head that that was slimmer towards the mouth and similar to a kangaroo's head. Their forearms, feet, and tips of their ears were black. It had a pale ashy brown pelt with a buff-yellow underbelly. There were differences in the head and body length of individuals. In general, male toolache wallabies were shorter than females. The texture and color of the fur changed seasonally or varied depending on the gender or individual. It had a distinct black mark on its face that reached from its nose to the eye. Mostly, a female's tail length was large than that of a male. But some taller males had long tails. The females have a pouch with an opening on the top. It had alternated light and dark gray stripes on its body. The tail was pale gray.

How cute are they?

The toolache wallaby was a graceful and elegant creature. The distinct black mark from the nose to the eye was the most attractive feature that set it apart from all other wallabies. The behavior of the mobs that were seen resting and grazing together was absolutely adorable.

How do they communicate?

This species of wallaby communicated by making thumping noises when they sensed danger. Some of them also produced hissing noises. The offspring communicated by making clicking noises.

How big is a toolache wallaby?

The length measurements differed between males and females and individuals as well. In general, male toolache wallabies had a head and body length of 32 in (81 cm) while the female's head and body length of 33 in (83 cm). A male wallaby's tail length was 31.8 in (81 cm), while a female wallaby's tail length was 27.9 in (71 cm).

How fast can a toolache wallaby run?

This wallaby from southeastern Australia was capable of running at great speeds. It could easily outrun its predators.

How much does a toolache wallaby weigh?

This extinct species of wallaby from southeastern Australia was 22 lb (10 kg).

What are the male and female names of the species?

Both the male and female species have several names. The males were referred to as boomers, bucks, or jacks while the females were called does, jills or flyers. Together as a group, they were known as a mob or troupe.

What would you call a baby toolache wallaby?

Just like juvenile kangaroos, a baby wallaby is called a joey.

What do they eat?

This extinct species of wallaby from southeastern Australia was a herbivore that mainly fed on plant matter such as grass and leaves. They also had fruits, ferns, and herbs from time to time. They were extensively hunted for their beautifully colored and soft textured fur. It was also hunted by other predators like red foxes, dingoes, wedge-tailed eagles, and Tasmanian devils. All of this led to a population decline and eventual extinction.

Are they dangerous?

The toolache wallaby (Macropus greyi) was known to be sociable. Unlike certain wallaby species that were suspicious of humans and kept their distance, this wallaby was very friendly. When threatened they delivered two to three powerful kicks just like zebras. They were not dangerous or violent unless provoked.

Would they make a good pet?

This species from South Australia was very a graceful and elegant creature. Unfortunately, they can no longer be pets as they are presumed to be extinct. They might not have survived peacefully when kept away from other members in captivity as the last known toolache wallaby only survived for a few days in captivity.

Kidadl Advisory: All pets should only be bought from a reputable source. It is recommended that as a potential pet owner you carry out your own research prior to deciding on your pet of choice. Being a pet owner is very rewarding but it also involves commitment, time and money. Ensure that your pet choice complies with the legislation in your state and/or country. You must never take animals from the wild or disturb their habitat. Please check that the pet you are considering buying is not an endangered species, or listed on the CITES list, and has not been taken from the wild for the pet trade.

Did you know...

In the 1920s a conservation effort was made to increase the population. An attempt to capture the species to keep them away from predators was made. Unfortunately, this only killed them except for one toolache wallaby. This last wallaby survived in captivity until 1939, after which it died.

Wallabies are nocturnal animals that are very active at night.

Wallabies are capable of pausing a pregnancy. The process is called embryonic diapause.

The closest member of this southeastern wallaby is the western bush wallaby.

How did the toolache wallaby become extinct? 

Toolache wallabies were known to be sociable creatures who lived throughout the southeastern corner of Australia to the western part of Victoria. However, animals like red foxes and dingoes hunted this species fiercely. They were hunted for sport and for their pale ashy brown pelt with a buff-yellow underbelly. Other than this they were also victims of habitat loss. This combination of numerous threats caused a population decline and eventual extinction. Currently, the toolache wallaby or Gray's wallaby is considered extinct although extensive research is being conducted to prove otherwise.

How far can a wallaby jump?

The long tail and well-built legs helped them jump higher without losing their balance. The male's tail length was 31.8 in (81 cm), while the female's tail length was 27.9 in (71 cm). They were able to jump at a height of 9.8 ft (3 m). The taller males had long tails.

 Here at Kidadl, we have carefully created lots of interesting family-friendly animal facts for everyone to discover! Learn more about some other mammals including mountain gorilla facts or reticulated giraffe facts pages.

You can even occupy yourself at home by coloring in one of our free printable toolache wallaby coloring pages.

Main image by Toby Hudson.

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