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100+ William Wordsworth Quotes To Inspire Every Romantic Poet

Contents
'Lyrical Ballads' is a collection of various poems by Wordsworth.

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William Wordsworth was a famous English poet who wrote beautiful romantic poems.

William Wordsworth's most famous poem is 'Tintern Abbey', it was published in 1798. Another famous work of Wordsworth was 'Lyrical Ballads', written with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and his other very famous work was the epic poem 'The Prelude'.

We have gathered lots of beautiful William Wordsworth quotations just for you, including 'Tintern Abbey' quotes and William Wordsworth poems on nature.

If you like these William Wordsworth lines, check out these [poetry quotes] and Tennessee Williams quotes too.

William Wordsworth Quotes On Nature

W. Wordsworth has written many romanticism quotes about nature.

The main themes of William Wordsworth's poems are nature, love, memory, humanity, mortality, and religion. There are a number of William Wordsworth's poems on nature and these depict his love for nature and its beauty. One of the most famous nature poems by William Wordsworth is 'I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud'. The thoughts of Wordsworth on nature were certainly very impressive and beautiful communicated. We have listed the best Wordsworth nature quotes here for you, including the beautiful, "Come forth into the light of things, let nature be your teacher," which is among the most famous Wordsworth quotes on nature. These William Wordsworth nature quotes and William Wordsworth quotes about nature will take you to the natural beauty of the earth, enjoy!

1. “Sweet is the lore which Nature brings; Our meddling intellect misshapes the beauteous forms of things—We murder to dissect.”

- William Wordsworth.

2. “For oft, when on my couch I lie in vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils.”

- William Wordsworth.

3. "All things have second birth; the earthquake is not satisfied at once."

- William Wordsworth.

4. "Why do not words and kiss, and solemn pledge, and nature that is kind in woman's breast, and reason that in man is wise and good, and fear of him who is a righteous Judge - why do not these prevail for human life, to keep two hearts together, that be."

- William Wordsworth.

5. "The flower of sweetest smell is shy and lowly."

- William Wordsworth.

6. "The silence that is in the starry sky, the sleep that is among the lonely hills."

- William Wordsworth.

7. "The mind of man is a thousand times more beautiful than the earth on which he dwells."

- William Wordsworth.

8. "Thou unassuming common-place of nature, with that homely face."

- William Wordsworth.

9. “Trailing clouds of glory do we come, from God, who is our home....”

- William Wordsworth.

10. “Knowing that nature never did betray the heart that loved her; 'Tis her privilege, through all the years of this our life, to lead from joy to joy."

- William Wordsworth.

11. “One impulse from a vernal wood may teach you more of man, of moral evil and of good than all the sages can.”

- William Wordsworth.

12. "How does the meadow flower its bloom unfold? Because the lovely little flower is free down to its root, and in that freedom bold."

- William Wordsworth.

13. “Therefore, let the moon shine on thee in thy solitary walk; And let the misty mountain winds be free to blow against thee.”

- William Wordsworth.

14. “The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers; Little we see in nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!”

- William Wordsworth.

15. “Come forth into the light of things, let nature be your teacher.”

- William Wordsworth.

16. "He is by nature led to peace so perfect that the young behold with envy, what the old man hardly feels."

- William Wordsworth.

17. “For I have learned to look on nature, not as in the hour of thoughtless youth; But hearing oftentimes The still, sad music of humanity.”

- William Wordsworth.

18. “What though the radiance that was once so bright, be now forever taken from my sight. Though nothing can bring back the hour of splendor in the grass, of glory in the flower; We will grieve not, rather find strength in what remains behind.”

- William Wordsworth.

19. “How does the meadow-flower its bloom unfold? Because the lovely little flower is free down to its root, and in that freedom bold.”

- William Wordsworth.

20. "Life is divided into three terms - that which was, which is, and which will be. Let us learn from the past to profit by the present, and from the present, to live better in the future."

- William Wordsworth.

21. “If this belief from heaven be sent, If such be Nature's holy plan, have I not reason to lament What man has made of man?”

- William Wordsworth.

22. "Therefore am I still a lover of the meadows and the woods, and mountains; And of all that we behold From this green earth."

- William Wordsworth.

23. "One daffodil is worth a thousand pleasures, then one is too few."

- William Wordsworth.

24. "Society became my glittering bride, And airy hopes my children."

- William Wordsworth.

25. "Poetry is the image of man and nature."

- William Wordsworth.

William Wordsworth Quotes On Love

“I cannot paint What then I was,” is a famous 'Tintern Abbey' quote.

William Wordsworth once called poetry "the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: It takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility." This shows how much he treasured the art form of poetry. 'She Was A Phantom Of Delight' is one of many famous love poems by William Wordsworth, and 'The Prelude' is another memorable love poem by William Wordsworth. We have compiled William Wordsworth's lines from his poems on love, and quotes from Wordsworth on love right here. Enjoy these Wordsworth love quotes!

26. “There is a comfort in the strength of love; 'Twill make a thing endurable, which else would overset the brain, or break the heart.”

- William Wordsworth.

27. "Come grow old with me. The best is yet to be."

- William Wordsworth.

28. “The best portion of a good man's life: His little, nameless unremembered acts of kindness and love.”

- William Wordsworth.

29. “He spake of love, such love as spirits feel in worlds whose course is equable and pure: No fears to beat away - no strife to heal, the past unsighed for, and the future sure.”

- William Wordsworth.

30. “Bliss it was in that dawn to be alive but to be young was very heaven.”

- William Wordsworth.

31. “What we have loved, others will love, and we will teach them how; Instruct them how the mind of man becomes a thousand times more beautiful than the earth on which he dwells.”

- William Wordsworth.

32. "Thanks to the human heart by which we live, thanks to its tenderness, its joys, and its fears, to me the meanest flower that blows can give Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears."

- William Wordsworth.

33. "The earth was all before me. With a heart Joyous, nor scared at its own liberty, I look about; And should the chosen guide Be nothing better than a wandering cloud, I cannot miss my way."

- William Wordsworth.

34. "Dreams, books, are each a world; And books, we know, are a substantial world, both pure and good: Round these, with tendrils strong as flesh and blood, our pastime and our happiness will grow."

- William Wordsworth.

35. "A cheerful life is what the muses love, a soaring spirit is their prime delight."

- William Wordsworth.

36. "And suddenly all your troubles melt away, all your worries are gone, and it is for no reason other than the look in your partner's eyes. Yes, sometimes life and love really is that simple."

- William Wordsworth.

37. "The child is the father of the man."

- William Wordsworth.

38. "She dwelt among the untrodden ways Beside the springs of dove, a maid whom there were none to praise And very few to love."

- William Wordsworth.

39. “I traveled among unknown men, In lands beyond the sea; Nor England! did I know till then What love I bore to thee?”

- William Wordsworth.

40. "My heart leaps up when I behold a rainbow in the sky: So was it when my life began; So is it now I am a man."

- William Wordsworth.

41. "Love betters what is best."

- William Wordsworth.

42. "Stern Winter loves a dirge-like sound."

- William Wordsworth.

43. "Sensations sweet, felt in the blood, and felt along the heart."

- William Wordsworth.

44. "What know we of the Blest above but that they sing, and that they love? "

- William Wordsworth.

45. "She gave me eyes, she gave me ears; And humble cares, and delicate fears; A heart, the fountain of sweet tears; and love and thought and joy."

- William Wordsworth.

46. "And you must love him, ere to you He will seem worthy of your love."

- William Wordsworth.

47. Oh, be wise, thou! Instructed that true knowledge leads to love."

- William Wordsworth.

48. "The unconquerable pang of despised love."

- William Wordsworth.

Wordsworth's Famous Poetry Lines

Below are the famous poetry lines by William Wordsworth.

49. “Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: It takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.”

- William Wordsworth.

50. "For by superior energies; More strict affiance in each other; Faith more firm in their unhallowed principles, the bad have fairly earned a victory over the weak, the vacillating, inconsistent good."

- William Wordsworth.

51. "O dearest, dearest boy! My heart For better lore would seldom yearn, Could I but teach the hundredth part of what from thee I learn."

- William Wordsworth.

52. "Not chaos, not the darkest pit of lowest Erebus, Nor aught of blinder vacancy, scooped out by help of dreams - can breed such fear and awe as fall upon us often when we look into our minds, into the mind of man."

- William Wordsworth.

53. "Not in Utopia, subterranean fields, Or some secreted island, heaven knows where! but in the very world, which is the world of all of us, the place wherein the end we find our happiness, or not at all!"

- William Wordsworth.

54. "Strongest minds are often those whom the noisy world hears least."

- William Wordsworth.

55. “I had melancholy thoughts... a strangeness in my mind, a feeling that I was not for that hour, nor for that place.”

- William Wordsworth.

56. "In sleep, I heard the northern gleams; The stars they were among my dreams; In sleep did I behold the skies."

- William Wordsworth.

57. "To her fair works did nature link, the human soul that through me ran; And much it grieved my heart to think what man has made of man."

- William Wordsworth.

58. “Poetry is the breath and finer spirit of knowledge; It is the impassioned expression which is the countenance of all science.”

- William Wordsworth.

59. “One lesson, Shepherd, let us two divide, taught both by what she shews, and what conceals, never to blend our pleasure or our pride with sorrow of the meanest thing that feels.”

- William Wordsworth.

60. “Where are your books? - that light bequeathed to beings else forlorn and blind! up! up! and drink the spirit breathed from dead men to their kind.”

- William Wordsworth.

61. “O joy! that in our embers Is something that doth live.”

-William Wordsworth.

62. “She died, and left to me this heath, this calm and quiet scene, the memory of what has been, and never more will be.”

- William Wordsworth.

63. “And yet the wiser mind mourns less for what age takes away than what it leaves behind.”

- William Wordsworth.

64. "Whither is fled the visionary gleam? Where is it now, the glory and the dream?"

- William Wordsworth.

65. "Action is transitory a step, a blow, the motion of a muscle, this way or that 'Tis done, and in the after-vacancy, we wonder at ourselves like men betrayed."

- William Wordsworth.

66. "Books! Tis a dull and endless strife: Come, hear the woodland linnet, how sweet his music! on my life, there's more of wisdom in it."

- William Wordsworth.

67. “Poetry is the first and last of all knowledge - it is as immortal as the heart of man.”

- William Wordsworth.

68. “But that night when on my bed I lay, I was most mov'd and felt most deeply in what world I was; with unextinguish'd taper I kept watch, reading at intervals.”

- William Wordsworth.

69. “I've heard of hearts unkind, kind deeds With coldness still returning; Alas! the gratitude of men Has oftener left me mourning.”

- William Wordsworth.

70. “I listen'd, motionless and still; And, as I mounted up the hill, the music in my heart I bore, long after it was heard no more.”

- William Wordsworth.

71. “So that almost a doubt within me springs of providence, such emptiness at length seems at the heart of all things. But, great God! I measure back the steps which I have trod.”

- William Wordsworth.

72. “Suffering is permanent, obscure, and dark, and has the nature of infinity.”

- William Wordsworth.

73. “Though inland far we be, Our souls have sight of that immortal sea Which brought us hither.”

- William Wordsworth.

74. “To be incapable of a feeling of poetry, in my sense of the word, is to be without love of human nature.”

- William Wordsworth.

75. "I wandered lonely as a cloud that floats on high o'er vales and hills when all at once I saw a crowd a host of golden daffodils beside the lake beneath the trees fluttering and dancing in the breeze."

- William Wordsworth.

76. "Blessings be with them, and eternal praise, Who gave us nobler loves, and nobler cares! the poets, who on earth have made us heirs Of truth and pure delight by heavenly lays."

- William Wordsworth.

77. "I am already kindly disposed towards you. My friendship it is not in my power to give: this is a gift which no man can make, it is not in our own power: a sound and healthy friendship is the growth of time and circumstance, it will spring up and thrive li."

- William Wordsworth.

78. "Feeling comes in aid of feeling, and diversity of strength attends us, if but once we have been strong."

- William Wordsworth.

79. "But the sweet face of Lucy Gray Will never more be seen. The storm came on before its time: She wandered up and down, and many a hill did Lucy climb: But never reached the town."

- William Wordsworth.

80. "And, when the stream Which overflowed the soul was passed away, a consciousness remained that it had left, Deposited upon the silent shore of memory, images and precious thoughts That shall not die, and cannot be destroyed."

- William Wordsworth.

81. "I'll teach my boy the sweetest things; I'll teach him how the owlet sings."

- William Wordsworth.

82. "It was an April morning, fresh and clear, the rivulet, delighting in its strength, ran with a young man's speed, and yet the voice of waters which the river had supplied was softened down in a vernal tone."

- William Wordsworth.

83. "Rapine, avarice, expense, this is idolatry; And these we adore; Plain living and high thinking are no more"

- William Wordsworth.

84. "We live by admiration, hope, and love; And even as these are well and wisely fixed, in dignity of being we ascend."

- William Wordsworth.

85. "Great God! I'd rather be a pagan suckled in a creed outworn, So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea; Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn."

- William Wordsworth.

86. "A creature not too bright or good, for human nature's daily food; For transient sorrows, simple wiles, Praise, blame, love, kisses, tears, and smiles."

- William Wordsworth.

87. "Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers – but like lemmings running headlong to the sea, we are oblivious.”

- William Wordsworth.

88. "Where lies the land to which yon Ship must go?"

- William Wordsworth.

89. "When from our better selves we have too long been parted by the hurrying world, and droop. Sick of its business, of its pleasures tired, how gracious, how benign is solitude."

- William Wordsworth.

90. "To character and success, two things, contradictory as they may seem, must go together . . . humble dependence on God and manly reliance on self."

- William Wordsworth.

91. "What is pride? A rocket that emulates the stars."

- William Wordsworth.

92. "By our own spirits are we deified: We poets in our youth begin in gladness, But thereof come in the end despondency and madness."

- William Wordsworth.

93. "O Reader! had you in your mind Such stores as silent thought can bring, O gentle reader! you would find a tale in everything."

- William Wordsworth.

94. "A few strong instincts, and a few plain rules."

- William Wordsworth.

95. "Hence, in a season of calm weather, Though inland far we be, Our souls have sight of that immortal sea."

- William Wordsworth.

96. "But, why, ungrateful, dwell on idle pain?"

- William Wordsworth.

97. “In ourselves, our safety must be sought. By our own right hand, it must be wrought.”

- William Wordsworth.

98. "Neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all the dreary intercourse of daily life, shall e'er prevail against us."

- William Wordsworth.

99. "Her eyes as stars of twilight fair; Like twilight's, too, her dusky hair. . . ."

- William Wordsworth.

100. "Be mild, and cleave to gentle things, thy glory and thy happiness be there."

- William Wordsworth.

101. “Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.”

― William Wordsworth.

At Kidadl, we have created lots of family-friendly quotes for everyone! If you liked our William Wordsworth quotes, why not check out these Keats quotes, or Yeats quotes too?

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The Kidadl Team is made up of people from different walks of life, from different families and backgrounds, each with unique experiences and nuggets of wisdom to share with you. From lino cutting to surfing to children’s mental health, their hobbies and interests range far and wide. They are passionate about turning your everyday moments into memories and bringing you inspiring ideas to have fun with your family.

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