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Eden Project

Please be aware of government guidelines before setting off.

Government Guidelines
  • Visit the Eden Project for some of the most diverse environmental landscapes to explore, from the fruits of the Med sea to the flowers of South Africa, to the scents of South America.
  • Don't miss out on adventures zip wiring, ice-skating, and more!
  • Check out the Education Centre to learn all about these fascinating biodomes of greenery.


The Eden Project is the world's largest indoor rainforest; you can trek through, take in the sights and explore the giant outdoor gardens. Designed by Nicholas Grimshaw in the late 1990s, and costing £56 million altogether, the Eden Project opened in 2001, becoming a significant project and of major importance. At the Eden Project, you can learn all about the captivating relationships between plants and people. With a full calendar of family events that run throughout the year, plus music festivals in the summer, you won't be short of a fantastic time.

The epic location of the Eden Project, Cornwall, makes it an unforgettable experience, which you can spend a whole day at! It is home to a garden which is the size of thirty football pitches and looks like a futuristic world in a crater that overlooks the pretty St Austell Bay. Boasting a regal rainforest cathedral, a conservatory full of fruits from the Mediterranean and blooming flowers from South Africa and California, horticulturist or not, you'll be sure to appreciate the beauty and serenity in this place. Also, in the landscaped grounds, there is tea, lavender, sunflowers and hemp.

There are many stories to learn here that everybody will find fascinating, from cocoa and coffee to paper and rubber, wine, perfume and brewing, the diversity is as vibrant as the setting. Experience the best sights, sounds and smells in Cornwall, as you walk through the rainforest, gardens, the oceanic islands, the greenery of Malaysia, the scents of West Africa and the tropical sounds of South America, in the largest greenhouse in the world, (known as the Humid Tropics Biome).

The Eden Project has an education centre, known as The Core, which is home to the Seed, a sculpture made from a single piece of granite and this is important because it weighs as much as ten elephants! The Core is the place to see all the exhibitions held at the Eden Project, all of which show how important the world of plants as well as different films, talk and children's workshops.

When the little ones want to let off some steam, there are plenty of play areas dotted around the Eden Project. These include fun mazes made of willow, large instruments to play music with, a ship made of wood that's perfect for climbing, a giant nutcracker, and a sandpit. There are also winding paths to walk and play on, or there is a land train tractor you can ride on, taking you through all the great sites of the Eden Project.

Don't miss out on Eden Project events, plus a range of thrilling activities on offer, from ice skating in the winter at the Eden Project ice skating rink, to an exhilarating 66m sky wire ride as you soar over the Biomes on the Eden Project zip wire. Plus, if that's not enough, there is a rock-climbing wall, and many events on throughout the year, often in correlation to the seasons.

When you're feeling hungry, there is a host of options to choose from, including the Canopy Café, Med Bar, Little Lunch box, Eden Coffee House and the Ice Cream Parlour, all of which are accompanied by beautiful plants.

Looking for somewhere nearby to stay for your visit to the Eden Project? There are plenty of adorable lodges, farm cottages and hotels to stay in, making your trip memorable and comfortable. Check out the Woodland Cottages at the Cornwall, The Cornhill Farm Cottages, The Premier Inn St Austin, The Cornwall Hotel and Spa, plus loads more varied options for every type of stay you could wish for.

For more great greenery to explore, check out the Lost Gardens of Heligan, and if the tropical climates inspire you to experience some sea and sand, check out Fistral Beach.

What to know before you go

  • There is a core external lift for visitors with access needs; there are easy access routes around the venue. The accessible route from the Visitor Centre to the Core is unavailable due to narrow footpaths between the bridge and the Visitor Centre. Areas within the Outdoor Gardens are highlighted; this is for the areas that are not wheelchair accessible.
  • There are toilets and accessible facilities on site in the Visitor Centre and ground floor of the Link building. Plus, there is a changing places toilet available in the Visitor Centre, too.
  • There are baby changing facilities available, as all buildings have unisex facilities, too. Every catering outlet has high chairs and microwaves; bottles can also be warmed up. For a private area to breastfeed, ask a member of staff who can find a private place for you.
  • There are manual wheelchairs available and powered wheelchairs available for pre-booking.
  • When you're feeling peckish, you can choose from freshly rolled burritos to delicious sourdough toasties, stone-baked pizza to hearty, healthy salad bowls, for foodies and picky eaters, there are lots to tickle your taste-buds. In the Biome, there's a drinks terrace, providing all the holiday feels you need.
  • There are clear navigable paths for wheelchair and pushchair users.

Getting there

  • If travelling via car, the Eden Project is well signposted, making it an easy and accessible journey. Situated just outside St Austell on the south coast of mid-Cornwall, and signposted from the A30, from Exeter and the A391/390 from Plymouth. Coming from outside Cornwall? Take the M5 southbound to Exeter, where the motorway splits. Then, take the A30 and exit at the Innis Downs junction on the A391, then follow the signs for Eden. It is important to note that SatNavs may take you along direct traffic along narrow roads to get to Eden. Sometimes westbound traffic from the A390 is taken from St Blazey via Cornhill Road to the Eden Project; this isn't recommended as the roads are very narrow.
  • There is plenty of free visitor parking at Eden. There is accessible parking: Apple Car Parks are available for use as drop-off points. You can then walk down to the visitor entrance and ticket desks or take a free park and ride bus. There are also three fast electric vehicle charging points located in the Banana car park, free of charge and operate on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • If travelling to the Eden Project via train, the closest Railway Station is St Austell, operating a service from London Paddington to Penzance mainline and then served by buses to the Eden Project. The bus is about half an hour, take bus 101. For a more scenic route, you can take the train to Luxulyan, Bugle or Par, and continue your journey on foot or by bike.
  • You can get to the Eden Project on foot, with off-road clay trails networks and National Cycle networks. There's much to discover on Cornwall’s mining heritage located along the off-road Clay Trails on 4-5-mile walking, cycling or even horse-riding, routes. Alternatively, you could walk or cycle the 2.5 miles from Luxulyan railway station (on the Newquay branch line).
  • If travelling from Newquay to Eden Project, you can fly into the Eden project, the closest airport to Eden is Newquay Cornwall Airport, and this is served by flights that arrive from all across the UK and some European cities, from London, Dublin, Dusseldorf, Alicante and more. From there you can get a taxi or hire a car.

Please follow the latest government guidelines if travelling by public transport.

Government Guidelines

Location

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