Fun Hypsibema Facts For Kids

Rhea Nischal
Jan 31, 2023 By Rhea Nischal
Originally Published on Sep 29, 2021
Edited by Katherine Cook
Fact-checked by Gowri Rao
Discover fun Hypsibema facts about its fossil remains, teeth, vertebrae, site, time period, and more!
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All ages
Read time: 7.5 Min

Hypsibema (Cope, 1869) is a genus comprising two hadrosaur species, namely, Hypsibema crassicauda (Cope 1869) and Hypsibema missouriensis (Baird and Horner, 1979). The fossil remains of this genus have been discovered in the Bollinger County's Ripley Formation, Missouri, and in North Carolina.

The species Hypsibema missouriensis is more well-known compared to Hypsibema crassicauda. The bones of Hypsibema missouriensis were discovered in 1942, from the Chronister Dinosaur Site near Glen Allen, Missouri. It was first thought to be a sauropod but was later considered a hadrosaur.

The Hypsibema missouriensis is the official state dinosaur of Missouri. It is a large-sized dinosaur that has a duck-shaped snout.

This snout is the origin of its common name, the duck-billed dinosaur. This plant-eating dinosaur possessed 1000 teeth and was able to chew through tough vegetation.

This state dinosaur was named Neosaurus missouriensis initially. It was then renamed Parrosaurus missouriensis by Stewart and Gilmore as the name 'Neosaurus' kept by Gilmore was already occupied.

It can also be spelled as Hypsibema missouriense. Some of the bones of this species discovered in 1942 found at the Chronister Dinosaur Site are housed in Washington, D.C.'s Smithsonian Institution. Some now are in the Bollinger County Museum of Natural History.

Had fun reading these fun facts? You must keep reading to discover interesting facts about its fossils, site, appearance, diet, classification, and more!

If you enjoyed reading our fun Daemonosaurus facts, you must check out our Velocipes and Dryosaurus interesting facts as well!

Hypsibema Interesting Facts

How do you pronounce 'Hypsibema'?

Hypsibema can be pronounced as 'hip-suh-bee-muh'.

What type of dinosaur was a Hypsibema?

The Hypsibema consists of two hadrosaur species. It belongs to the kingdom Animalia, phylum Chordata, order Ornithischia, superorder Dinosauria, suborder Ornithopoda, and the superfamily Hadrosauroidea. The species Hypsibema missouriensis was initially named Neosaurus missouriensis but was later named Parrosaurus missouriensis by Stewart and Gilmore. The name kept by Gilmore had to be changed as Neosaurus was occupied.

It can also be spelled as Hypsibema missouriense. It was initially described by Gilmore (1945) as a sauropod. It was considered a hadrosaur in 1980.

In which geological period did the Hypsibema roam the Earth?

It has been estimated that this duck billed dinosaur existed during the Late Cretaceous period, more than 75 million years ago.

When did the Hypsibema become extinct?

This duck-billed dinosaur is believed to have gone extinct 75 million years ago!

Where did a Hypsibema live?

Fossils of the Hypsibema have been discovered in the Bollinger County's Ripley Formation, Missouri, and North Carolina. This dinosaur is believed to be endemic to North America.

The fossil remains of the official state dinosaur of Missouri, Hypsibema missouriensis, were discovered in 1942 near Glen Allen, at the Chronister Dinosaur Site. The fossil remains present at this site were believed to be of a small sauropod Neosaurus initially by Gilmore (1945).

It was renamed Parrosaurus as the Neosaurus name Gilmore gave this species was already occupied.

This dinosaur existed during the Late Cretaceous Period and was discovered in 1942 for the first time near Glen Allen, suggesting that it lived in southeast Missouri. Bones discovered from the Chronister Dinosaur Site can be found in Washington, D.C.'s Smithsonian Institution as well as at Bollinger County Museum of Natural History.

What was a Hypsibema's habitat?

This duck-billed dinosaur is assumed to have inhabited woodlands, where there was running water nearby and an abundant food supply to fulfill its dietary requirements. It is also known that the vegetation of Missouri, where the fossils have been discovered had tough, coarse vegetation.

Who did a Hypsibema live with?

This official state dinosaur is believed to have traveled in herds. It is also known to have co-existed with Pentaceratops, Labocania, and Huaxiagnathus dinosaurs during the Late Cretaceous period.

How long did a Hypsibema live?

The lifespan of these Late Cretaceous period dinosaurs is not yet evaluated by paleontologists.

How did they reproduce?

Like all other species of dinosaurs, these dinosaurs, Hypsibema missouriensis and Hypsibema crassicauda, also reproduced by laying eggs. These eggs are believed to have been laid in the coastal plains of Missouri.

Hypsibema Fun Facts

What did a Hypsibema look like?

Everything we have learned about Missouri's state dinosaur, Hypsibema missouriense, is from the fossils of its caudal vertebrae (tail), teeth, femoral fragments, and snout. They suggest that it weighed between 2.7-3.6 tons (3-4 short tons).

Its length has been estimated to have ranged between 30–35 ft (9.1–10.66 m). It possessed 1,000 sharp teeth that aided it in chewing the coarse vegetation of Missouri during the Late Cretaceous period.

It has been concluded that it was a herbivore and not a carnivore due to the greater number of serrated teeth it possessed, compared to other hadrosaurs. It was initially considered to be a sauropod but was later considered to be a hadrosaur that possessed a duck-bill-shaped snout.

These dinosaurs in the Hypsibema genus are known as duck-billed dinosaurs due to their snout shape!
We've been unable to source an image of Hypsibema and have used an image of Tlatolophus instead. If you are able to provide us with a royalty-free image of Hypsibema, we would be happy to credit you. Please contact us at hello@kidadl.com.

How many bones did a Hypsibema have?

The total number of bones that this dinosaur possessed is not yet known. However, we do know that fossil remains of this state dinosaur of Missouri excavated comprised caudal vertebrae (tail), teeth, femoral bones, and snout.

The snout fossils of this dinosaur are quite similar to the bills of ducks, which is why it is also called the duck-billed dinosaur.

It was first thought of as a sauropod but was considered to be a hadrosaur later on. Bones discovered from the Chronister Dinosaur Site can be found in Washington, D.C.'s Smithsonian Institution as well as at Bollinger County Museum of Natural History.

How did they communicate?

It is believed that these duck-billed dinosaurs communicated with each other through bellows (deep, loud roars) and visual displays.

How big was a Hypsibema?

Missouri's state dinosaur, Hypsibema missouriense, is estimated to have attained a length of 30–35 ft (9.1–10.7 m) and a height of 10 ft (3 m)! Its height is three times the length of the Pisanosaurus!

How fast could a Hypsibema move?

The exact speed of the Hypsibema dinosaur has not yet been evaluated. However, we do know that a hadrosaur could hop quite fast and they are estimated to have moved at a speed of about 38 mph (61.1 kph)!

How much did a Hypsibema weigh?

Missouri's state dinosaur, Hypsibema missouriense, has been estimated to weigh between the range of 2.7-3.6 tons (3-4 short tons)!

What were the male and female names of the species?

The suffix of the term dinosaur is saurus for males and saura is for females.

What would you call a baby Hypsibema?

A baby dinosaur species, like the Hypsibema missouriense, can be referred to as a hatchling or juvenile.

What did they eat?

Missouri's state dinosaur,  Hypsibema missouriense, was a herbivore whose jaws comprised a bizarre number of teeth. There were more than 1000 teeth present in the jaws that were specialized to chew through the fibrous, tough vegetation of Missouri during the Late Cretaceous period.

The Hypsibema crassicauda was an expert eater, similar to other hadrosaurids.

It is also believed that it could have foraged 13.1 ft (4 m) above the ground! It is believed to have been attacked by members of the Tyrannosauroidea as teeth of an unknown member of this superfamily were found along with the Hypsibema fossils.

How aggressive were they?

These Late Cretaceous dinosaurs of this genus are believed to be not as aggressive as the carnivores that existed during the same period 75 million years ago. However, given the number of teeth and their body structure, they are assumed to be quite powerful and could have protected themselves well.

Did you know...

The Chronister Dinosaur Site was discovered in 1942 accidentally when a well was being dug by the Chronister family!

The official Missouri state dinosaur, Hypsibema missouriensis, was designated in 2004 and the law stating it as the official state dinosaur can be located in chapter 10 of the Missouri Revised Statutes!

Hypsibema crassicauda species of this genus was described in 1869 by Edward Drinker Cop.

The generic name originates from the Greek terms 'hypsi' and 'bema' that translate to 'high' and 'step' respectively. This name was kept because the paleontologist Cope felt that this dinosaur moved around erect on its toes.

The specific name of the species Hypsibema crassicauda is a Latin term that means 'with a fat tail'!

The largest recognized ornithischian is the species Shantungosaurus giganteus!

Tullimonstrum gregarium is the Illinois state dinosaur!

What is the state dinosaur of Missouri?

The Hypsibema missouriensis (big lizard) is a 35.5 ft (10.6 m) long dinosaur that possesses 1,000 teeth. This extraordinary dinosaur has been chosen to be the official state dinosaur of Missouri in 2004, on July 9. The remains of this duck-billed dinosaur were discovered near Glen Allen in 1942.

What dinosaur has 500 teeth?

The Nigersaurus is a dinosaur that has 500 teeth present in its jaw! This is half of the number of teeth Missouri's State Dinosaur,  Hypsibema Missouriensis, possesses.

Here at Kidadl, we have carefully created lots of interesting family-friendly dinosaur facts for everyone to discover! Learn more about some other creatures from our Archaeoceratops facts and Pegomastax fun facts for kids.

You can even occupy yourself at home by coloring in one of our free printable Hypsibema coloring pages.

Main image by Joaquin Eng Ponce

Second image by Levi Bernardo

*We've been unable to source an image of Hypsibema and have used an image of Tlatolophus instead. If you are able to provide us with a royalty-free image of Hypsibema, we would be happy to credit you. Please contact us at hello@kidadl.com.

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Written by Rhea Nischal

Bachelor of Business Administration specializing in Management

Rhea Nischal picture

Rhea NischalBachelor of Business Administration specializing in Management

A background in Business Administration and Management from MCM DAV College, Rhea has led her to work for her father's global business. However, her passion for content production, where she manages operations to ensure all processes run smoothly. Outside of work, she enjoys playing the piano and spending time with her one-year-old nephew.

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Fact-checked by Gowri Rao

Bachelor of Arts specializing in Economics

Gowri Rao picture

Gowri RaoBachelor of Arts specializing in Economics

With a bachelor's degree in Economics from Krea University, Gowri is a highly skilled data analyst and an expert in regression and causation modeling. Her interests in economic trends, finance, and investment research complement her professional expertise. In addition to her professional pursuits, Gowri enjoys swimming, running, and playing the drums, and she is also a talented tutor.

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